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Posts tagged with "allstars"

oh, ok. this can’t really wait until next year..

(via Code One Magazine’s Facebook page)

oh, ok. this can’t really wait until next year..

(via Code One Magazine’s Facebook page)

Sep 5
the “most aircraft in flight in one photo” challenge

"Air group six of the USS Enterprise (CV 6) pictured in flight over ships during exercises at sea" 

I count eighty.

(via, and spotted in the Planeshots Tumblr’s “Formation Flight Sunday”)

the “most aircraft in flight in one photo” challenge

"Air group six of the USS Enterprise (CV 6) pictured in flight over ships during exercises at sea"

I count eighty.

(via, and spotted in the Planeshots Tumblr’sFormation Flight Sunday”)

last week, I posted a photo challenge.

one of the missions was to find a post-Second World War photograph showing more than 40 aircraft in the air. I chose that number because of the photos above - which show five European aerobatic teams in a huge formation - taken at the “Air 04” show in Payerne, Switzerland, in 2004.

(the teams are: the Frecce Tricolori, Team 60, the Patrouille Suisse, the Patrulla Aguila, and the Red Arrows)

there are a couple of photos that beat this number…

(Source: milspotters.nl)

Aug 9
"DC-10 arrives at the Falls fire.” (via the Corona Fire Department ‘s Facebook page)

"DC-10 arrives at the Falls fire.” (via the Corona Fire Department ‘s Facebook page)

“Clay Lacy, in his DC-7 “Super Snoopy”, races a dragster during the 1971 San Diego Cup airshow” (via)

Clay Lacy, in his DC-7Super Snoopy”, races a dragster during the 1971 San Diego Cup airshow” (via)

Smoke-N-Thunder’s Scott Hammack ‘racing’ the Gee Bee R-2 replica, flown by Delmar Benjamin, late 1990s
(huge thanks to Bill Braack for the image)

Smoke-N-Thunder’s Scott Hammack ‘racing’ the Gee Bee R-2 replica, flown by Delmar Benjamin, late 1990s

(huge thanks to Bill Braack for the image)

"The “Human Fly” atop a DC-8 at the Mojave 1000 (1970)” (via)

"The “Human Fly” atop a DC-8 at the Mojave 1000 (1970)” (via)

“Ejection escape system for a passenger airplane
US 6695257 B2
ABSTRACT
An ejection escape system for passenger airplane that there is a locking mechanism at the connection of the left top cabin cover, the right top cabin cover with the airplane body, there is also a locking mechanism at the connection of the left top cabin cover and the right top cabin cover, the passenger seat is an ejection escape seat, the switches for the locking mechanism and the ejection escape seat are installed in the cockpit, where the pilot can turn on the locking mechanism switch to open the left and right top cabin covers and turn on the ejection escape switch to eject the seat out of the airplane through the opening of the left and right top cabin covers.” (via)

Ejection escape system for a passenger airplane
US 6695257 B2
ABSTRACT
An ejection escape system for passenger airplane that there is a locking mechanism at the connection of the left top cabin cover, the right top cabin cover with the airplane body, there is also a locking mechanism at the connection of the left top cabin cover and the right top cabin cover, the passenger seat is an ejection escape seat, the switches for the locking mechanism and the ejection escape seat are installed in the cockpit, where the pilot can turn on the locking mechanism switch to open the left and right top cabin covers and turn on the ejection escape switch to eject the seat out of the airplane through the opening of the left and right top cabin covers.” (via)

“Shakir S. Jerwan, chief pilot of the Moisant Aviation School, Long Island, with his dog ‘Monoplane’. July 1912” (via)

Shakir S. Jerwan, chief pilot of the Moisant Aviation School, Long Island, with his dog ‘Monoplane’. July 1912” (via)

On November 4th 1909, John Moore-Brabazon proved to the world that pigs really are capable of flight.

The French journal La Revue de l’Aviation reported on the historic flight:
“The English aviator..had the rather extravagant idea to fly with a little pig which was perched in a wicker basket with this inscription..:”I am the first pig to fly”. The little pig did not fly for very long, but during the voyage it emitted, it is said, some grunts of satisfaction…or fear..”

(via)
“Boeing HLH and Russian Mil V-12 heavy lifting helicopters” (art by Wilf Hardy, circa 1972)

Boeing HLH and Russian Mil V-12 heavy lifting helicopters” (art by Wilf Hardy, circa 1972)

The Big Book of Flight


It’s a good thing to have a long-standing interest and passion in a subject. It’s an even better thing if you can include aspects of that interest and passion into your day job. It is, however, another thing entirely if you can crystallize that interest and passion into a single all-encompassing, lavishly produced, confidently written 320-page book.

Rowland White had a number of trump cards up his sleeve in order to accomplish this. Firstly: a self-confessed life-long interest in aviation, and writing about it - always keeping his boyhood giddiness near the surface. Secondly: A career in book publishing. Lastly: His own career as an author of three published aviation books, most famously the exhilarating Vulcan 607.

Mix these all up, and The Big Book of Flight is the result. The simplest way to describe it would be as an aviation equivalent of The Dangerous Book for Boys - a big, chunky guide/reference book - but it is an immense creation, a “celebration” - as the publisher puts it. As with The Aviation Historian, this is what can be produced when passion and industry skills combine. The general design, matte printing, and paintings by Philip E West also make the book a tribute to the vintage British books and “boy’s own” comics of old.


It starts with a poem, and an article on the early “birdmen” - and ends with a history of drones, and a final poem. In-between is an explosion of info-graphics, stories, paintings, tributes, and lists. There are dozens of 2-6 page summaries on a huge spectra of topics - such as the history of ballooning, aerial warfare in WW2, airline food, and UFOs.

The content is passionate and fearless - as such a huge amount of topics and data is surely going to be a big magnet for the critics and pedants out there. Those that take their aviation more seriously will have possible coronary issues with various sections on aviation references in movies, music, and popular culture - but any book that references the likes of Warren Ellis, Gruff Rhys, and The Final Countdown is alllllllright by me.


In Summary: AN ESSENTIAL OBJECT

TBBOF website (including preview) | Rowland White on Twitter

The Aviation Historian is a relatively new quarterly publication - the first issue being released in October last year.

The journal is the creation of Nick Stroud and Mick Oakey - the former Editor and Deputy Editor of the much respected Aeroplane magazine. Between them, they have come up with a National Geograpic sized, perfect-bounded gem, with digital editions also available. The 130-page size makes it only slightly bigger than a “standard” magazine, but there are only two pages of adverts inside each issue.

Their guiding principles seem to be this: a “standard” message from the editor, letters section, reviews section, a couple of short regular features - but then complete freedom to publish over a dozen articles across a wide variety of subjects, using their combined skills, experiences, and general passion for aviation.

It is the variety of the articles that make TAH a stand-out for me. Where other publications would be concerned about devoting pages to current news, concentrating on a particular era for it’s articles (including adverts aimed at that era), and keeping a certain status-quo in order to not offend an established readership, TAH - as the new and versatile kid on the block - just “goes for it”.

With a staff of only four - Mick, Nick, and their spouses - and the only contact number being a mobile phone, it feels part guerrilla publication, part fanzine, and part labor of love - but don’t be misled, as the print quality, design, and art (including illustrations by Ian Bott and Juanita Franzi) is of an extremely high standard. TAH’s editorial board includes the likes of Philip Jarrett - who will be familiar to British readers - and Dr Richard Hallion.

TAH can be considered a very British publication, but should appeal to an international audience - some of the featured articles so far including the death of Carole Lombard, NASA’s Mercury programme spacesuits, the B-35 flying wing, the history of the CIA’s "Air America", the Canadian CF-105 Arrow, and post WW2 Soviet jet technology.


In summary: RECOMMENDED

TAH Website | TAH Twitter | TAH Facebook

“90th Bomb Group Photo”
(via the SDASM Archives on Flickr)

90th Bomb Group Photo”
(via the SDASM Archives on Flickr)

sunday fantasy 407: Yukinobu Hoshino

Please allow me to wax lyrical for a bit.

This is taken from “Where Eagles Dare”, a short story in Hoshino’s speculative/fantastical WW2 manga work “The Temple of El Alamein”. The story concludes with an encounter between a Messerschmitt Me 262 and Boeing B-29 Superfortress - something that never happened during the war.

(Other chapters involve, pyramids, dinosaurs, wicker men, and why Germany never actually invaded the United Kingdom…)

Hoshino also did “The Sea of Fallen Beasts”, which has stories along similar lines - but he is best known for his character Professor Munakata (the slightly disappointing - despite featuring airships - Professor Munakata’s British Museum Adventure being the only work released in the west), and also his science fiction works - of which the following needs mentioning:

2001 Nights : One of my favourite works of science fiction of all time, across any medium. I cannot stress enough how much these stories - starting in the SDI era and then into mankind’s journeys to the stars - have affected me over the years. The series was published in the US in the mid-90’s, and is bottomlessly recommended. Hoshino released a sequel of sorts - 2001+5 - in 2006, but it has yet to be translated into English (legally or not) UPDATE: “scanlated” here

Stardust Memories : Similar stories to the above, but overall slightly inferior due to the lack of narrative linking them. Not officially released in English, but scanlated here

Kodoku Experiment : Your standard tale of an unstoppable extraterrestrial lifeform unleashed on a spaceship, but very enjoyable. Again, Not officially released in English, but scanlated here

sunday fantasy 407: Yukinobu Hoshino

Please allow me to wax lyrical for a bit.

This is taken from “Where Eagles Dare”, a short story in Hoshino’s speculative/fantastical WW2 manga work “The Temple of El Alamein”. The story concludes with an encounter between a Messerschmitt Me 262 and Boeing B-29 Superfortress - something that never happened during the war.

(Other chapters involve, pyramids, dinosaurs, wicker men, and why Germany never actually invaded the United Kingdom…)

Hoshino also did “The Sea of Fallen Beasts”, which has stories along similar lines - but he is best known for his character Professor Munakata (the slightly disappointing - despite featuring airships - Professor Munakata’s British Museum Adventure being the only work released in the west), and also his science fiction works - of which the following needs mentioning:


2001 Nights : One of my favourite works of science fiction of all time, across any medium. I cannot stress enough how much these stories - starting in the SDI era and then into mankind’s journeys to the stars - have affected me over the years. The series was published in the US in the mid-90’s, and is bottomlessly recommended. Hoshino released a sequel of sorts - 2001+5 - in 2006, but it has yet to be translated into English (legally or not) UPDATE: “scanlated” here

Stardust Memories : Similar stories to the above, but overall slightly inferior due to the lack of narrative linking them. Not officially released in English, but scanlated here

Kodoku Experiment : Your standard tale of an unstoppable extraterrestrial lifeform unleashed on a spaceship, but very enjoyable. Again, Not officially released in English, but scanlated here