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Posts tagged with "1930s"

the Bernard HV 42, circa 1931 (via)

the Bernard HV 42, circa 1931 (via)

"The engineer in the machine centre operated the throttles of the 12 engines [of the Dornier Do X flying boat]” (via)

"The engineer in the machine centre operated the throttles of the 12 engines [of the Dornier Do X flying boat]” (via)

"The Dornier Flying Boat invented by German pioneer Claude Dornier (1884 - 1969) at Calshot.” (via)

"The Dornier Flying Boat invented by German pioneer Claude Dornier (1884 - 1969) at Calshot.” (via)

Sep 6
the NIAI RK-I extending-wing aircraft, circa 1938 (via)

the NIAI RK-I extending-wing aircraft, circa 1938 (via)

Sep 6
the Bisnovat SK-1, circa 1938 (via)

the Bisnovat SK-1, circa 1938 (via)

Sep 6
the Bartini Stal-6, circa 1930 (via)

the Bartini Stal-6, circa 1930 (via)

"Berlin flak protection

All around the capital in a wide arc lies a broad iron line of defense, the safe haven of the imperial capital from enemy attacks from the air. Day and night the men of the air defense, whether on anti-aircraft gun, searchlight, or listening device, are on the watch. We take photographs of the visit of our reporter to the anti-aircraft artillery.
Shown here: one of the giant listening devices that can capture even the slightest noise of an engine.”
(1939, via)

"Berlin flak protection

All around the capital in a wide arc lies a broad iron line of defense, the safe haven of the imperial capital from enemy attacks from the air. Day and night the men of the air defense, whether on anti-aircraft gun, searchlight, or listening device, are on the watch. We take photographs of the visit of our reporter to the anti-aircraft artillery.
Shown here: one of the giant listening devices that can capture even the slightest noise of an engine.”
(1939, via)

the Tupolev TB-3 (via)

the Tupolev TB-3 (via)

May 3
Alan Cobham’s Flying Circus, 1931 (via)

Alan Cobham’s Flying Circus, 1931 (via)

The Handley Page H.P.39 Gugnunc, Cierva C.19 Mark III autogyro, and Westland-Hill Pterodactyl IV - at the Royal Air Force Display, Hendon, 1931 (more)

The Handley Page H.P.39 Gugnunc, Cierva C.19 Mark III autogyro, and Westland-Hill Pterodactyl IV - at the Royal Air Force Display, Hendon, 1931 (more)

"The Westland CL 20 Autogiro outside the Cierva Autogiro Company sheds at Hanworth.” (via)

"The Westland CL 20 Autogiro outside the Cierva Autogiro Company sheds at Hanworth.” (via)

"A Cierva autogiro / autogyro (instead of a plane with wings a propeller) in Barcelona on takeoff at tram line wires and crashed flown, Spain 1935." (via)

"A Cierva autogiro / autogyro (instead of a plane with wings a propeller) in Barcelona on takeoff at tram line wires and crashed flown, Spain 1935." (via)

"A Kellett Autogiro flying mail off the roof of the Philadelphia Post Office at 8th and Chestnut Streets, circa 1935” (via)

"A Kellett Autogiro flying mail off the roof of the Philadelphia Post Office at 8th and Chestnut Streets, circa 1935” (via)

“Pitcairn P-19 Autogiro was the largest American autogiro built. Five were constructed but it failed to find a market due to the Depression" (via)

Pitcairn P-19 Autogiro was the largest American autogiro built. Five were constructed but it failed to find a market due to the Depression" (via)

“Will Defy the laws of Gravitation

Under basic patents granted to W. Pitts of Los Angeles California., W.P. Kindree has developed this unique helicopter with which he hopes to take to the air shortly. The motor, not yet installed, weighs 235 pounds and develops 65 horse power. The mushroom propellor composed of sixty blades may be tipped 45 degrees in any direction, which means that after the plane once gains altitude it may be flown in the manner of an ordinary plane. The mushroom rotates and reciprocates 20 inches with each revolution. 29/10.30”


(With thanks to Chris Michell, who posted the original image here, and also to Paul Dunlop, who found mention of the craft here)

Will Defy the laws of Gravitation

Under basic patents granted to W. Pitts of Los Angeles California., W.P. Kindree has developed this unique helicopter with which he hopes to take to the air shortly. The motor, not yet installed, weighs 235 pounds and develops 65 horse power. The mushroom propellor composed of sixty blades may be tipped 45 degrees in any direction, which means that after the plane once gains altitude it may be flown in the manner of an ordinary plane. The mushroom rotates and reciprocates 20 inches with each revolution. 29/10.30”


(With thanks to Chris Michell, who posted the original image here, and also to Paul Dunlop, who found mention of the craft here)